So I’m going through my steam list and pruning all the games I’m never going to play. I’ve tried out a few of the smaller games and I have to say Bit.Trip Beat is pretty fun but it really screws with the eyes. Same with

boxeswithguns except that’s not that fun. I’ve hidden like 100 games so far. I just have so many…

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Pokemon Moon #4

This contains some spoilers.

Well, I’ve discovered the joys of Wonder Trade. It’s not that different from the previous iterations. Though I did have some difficulty with the global link not working for days. I did like 4 trades and now I have a Chikorita. It looks like somebody might be IV breeding since it’s lvl 1. But since I’m not that far into the game, I don’t have a way of knowing what the Chikorita’s IVs are. 

I haven’t whited out so far, but I have gotten really close, like twice. I don’t really know the type match-ups that well. Fairy messed everything up for me XD Basically a Carbink almost wiped out my team due to me not knowing what move to use. I though it was rock-ice but nope, apparently its rock-fairy.

I mean come on… That looks like it would be an ice type. 

The second time I was facing the totem Pokemon for the 3rd? trial. It was for the water Z-gem. I pretty much have a severe type weakness to water since my only Pokemon good against it, is Sparky, my Pichu. My Pichu is very easy to kill. I apparently missed the Soothe Bell, so at some point I need to go back and grab it. Luckily Mob, my Kadabra pulled through and won the fight. One day I’ll trade it to get an Alakazam. 

There was a bit of nod to Pokemon Gold and Silver with the Sudowoodo blocking the path. I also met my proper rival. At least I think he is XD I mean Hau is always there to fight me for fun but he feels more like a friend than a rival, y’know. He’s not really competing with me, its like hes along for the ride and having fun while doing so. 

I’ve discovered the Pokemon Day-Care and they’ve made some changes to it. Basically you can put Pokemon with them but they don’t grow stronger over time, its now just for breeding. I don’t know if there’s going to be a place later on where they’ll take your Pokemon and then train them up while you walk. I’m trying to avoid as much spoilers as possible. But that is an interesting decision. Maybe they removed that completely since people only used the day care for breeding, not raising Pokemon.  

Anyways my team so far is:

  • Kiro, lvl 28 Torracat
  • Sparky, lvl 23 Pichu
  • Wingu, lvl 22 Wingull
  • Mob, lvl 23 Kadabra
  • Loony, lvl 22 Drifloon

I’m carrying around an egg with me. I have no idea what its going to be XD I’m thinking of changing Loony with something. I don’t know what. Maybe a different kind of ghost Pokemon? If I ever find a Shinx, I’m definitely replacing Sparky. I love Luxray. Luxray is my fave Pokemon. I hoping to get a Mudkip, with an attack boosting nature at some point because I have the best moveset for Swampert. 

Anyways back to playing some more Pokemon 🙂

Pokemon Moon #3

Finally left the first island. I spent way too long looking around the cities and petting my Pokemon. It’s really easy to get them to love you and its worth taking the time XD You get a greater chance at getting crits and avoiding attacks. Plus their reactions are super cute.

I’m trying to evolve my Pichu but I can’t remember if it was affection or friendship that it needs. I don’t quite remember all the ways friendship is raised. I just know Soothe Bell is good for it. Something to look up later I guess. 

Gotta say I’m enjoying Pokemon Moon a lot more than Y. I think even more than Omega Ruby too. I just love that it doesn’t take itself too seriously and the characters have really fun personalities. The changes they’ve made to the game are a nice change to the same old formula that’s been used for the past 20 years. 

Pokemon Moon #2

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I’m loving Team Skull XD

There’s one bit later on where you can ask them who they are again and their reaction is the greatest. 

My fire cat finally evolved. It has this bell looking thing under its chin that burns your hand if you touch it. I can’t wait for bara cat 😀 I think I’ve overgrinded a bit since I was determined to grab myself an Abra. So I’m like 10 levels higher than most of the trainers I’m finding. 

Pokemon Moon #1

It’s fun when you accidentally forget to save then turn off the console. I basically lost a bit of progress due to playing late into the night and then turning off my 3DS in a fit of sleep deprivation.

I’ve made it back again and more. I spent ages picking up a Pichu, because I accidentally killed it with a single scratch.

I have myself a fire kitten called Kiro, a Wingull called Wingu (because I’ve been naming them that ever since Sapphire and Ruby XD). I also have a Pichu, a Grubbin and a Pikipek. Though once the Grubbin and Pikipek have evolved I’m probably going to put them back in the PC XD

Well. Found out a pretty major issue with using Discord. You can’t change the default general channel. So basically if we wanted to add in people who we aren’t comfortable sharing particular info with, they can get into the channel that we’ve been using for months and read everything. 

So now I’ve got a bot in, to delete all the message history for that channel. I mean its not really that much of a loss? We don’t really check over our history, but it still kinda sucks. Its going to take foreverrrr too. 

Device6 and The Stanley Parable Analysis

Device6 is an interactive novel on iOS devices. It won Excellence in Audio, and was a finalist for Excellence in Narrative, Excellence in Visual Arts, and Seumas McNally Grand Prize. It was also an honourable mention for the Excellence in Design and Nuovo Award. The player plays as Anne who is suffering from amnesia. Anne wakes up on an island brimming with 60s aesthetics accompanied by an atmospheric jazz score. The player has to find out the truth behind Anne’s amnesia, the island and the reason for everything through and thrilling and interesting narrative.

The Stanley Parable is a first person exploration, PC game. It was originally a Half-Life 2 Mod, that became widely successful which allowed the developers to release a paid remake of it. The Stanley Parable won the Audience Award in the Independent Games Festival. It was a finalist in Excellence in Audio, Excellence in Narrative and Seumas McNally Grand Prize. The game has a limited amount of interaction where the player can perform actions in certain parts of the environment such as pressing buttons or opening doors. The narrative of the game is presented to the player via the voice of the Narrator. He explains that the protagonist Stanley who the player is controlling, works in an office building whose job is push buttons when prompted on a screen without question. One day no prompts come and Stanley not sure what’s going on or what to do starts to explore the building and finds that everybody is missing. It is then that the player is presented with the first choice which spirals rapidly into an exploration of the illusion of choice and unquestioning nature of players in video games.

The layout of the text in Device6 gives a sense of the player’s movement through the scene, and become a map. The character’s thoughts are laid out outside of the narrative like afterthoughts that allow the player to understand the character that they’re playing. The game encourages the use of outside objects to have the player progress through puzzles, an example of which requires the use of a mirror to allow the player to read a part of the text. The technique is similar to that of Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves. In which the typography is used to make the the reader uneasy and create pace and movement.

Device6’s prose seamlessly hops between horror/ suspense and humor while still remaining mysterious. The images and audio with the text add to the narrative while having clues in amongst them that are needed to solve puzzles. At the end of each chapter, the player reaches the puzzle that they must solve in order to continue to the next. The player must then backtrack and take note of everything that’s provided for them to figure the problem out.

The Stanley Parable is more about the Narrator than anything else. The quirky dark humor that the smooth voice employs makes the game enjoyable. The Narrator comments on everything that the player does, including when the player chooses to disobey whatever they’re supposed to be doing. The environments are bright and cheery, yet unremarkable. The limited interaction to the environment is only there to really serve as more interaction between the player and the Narrator. The game has multiple paths that the player can follow, each exploring the main concept of the game. The endings may have some relation to each other but at other times, not. But more often than not, will reveal more and more of what the designers are trying to get across to the player. It is made known that the game is constructed by developers and that every single thing the player attempts, it’s all been accounted for.

Both games are heavily story-based, the narration is what makes them enjoyable experiences even though they have very little interaction. They push the boundaries of already established narrative norms in video games, where story is pushed to the background to make way for the gameplay. There have been some exceptions to the norm but even then the stories are confined to the mechanics. The Stanley Parable is a direct dialogue on this, it talks about this free-will and how it doesn’t exist in video games. That it isn’t possible. Device6 on the other hand, is less about this concept and more on the combination of storytelling with gameplay interaction in a way that isn’t contrived and makes sense.

These games are important to the change in narrative to video games. They offer an alternative to the mass of samey-same games that care very little about the role of the story and show how it can be done in an interesting and engaging manner.

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